2010-07-30

NEW ONLINE SOUND ART RESOURCE

PRODUCED BY THE WIRED LAB

The WIRED Lab’s new wiredlab.org website documents the activities, history and research surrounding the 'The Wires', a unique and distinctly Australian invention that primarily exists in rural landscapes.

The WIRED Lab site provides unprecedented documentation and access to the remarkable work and legacy of Alan Lamb and ‘The Wires’ a distinctive large-scale ├Žolian instrument he has been developing since the 1970’s. Sound designers from around the world have featured Lamb’s atmospheric and intense ‘Wire’ music in cult films such as Wolf Creek, Julian Donkey Boy, The Boys and Herzog’s Scream of Stone. Legend has it that Lamb shared his techniques with sound designers from the original Star Wars series.

Based in rural South West NSW The WIRED Lab is an Artist Run Initiative, established to ensure the legacy of 'The Wires' an inherently interdisciplinary instrument with foundations in sculpture, land art, sound, music, interactivity, bio resonance, physics and complex systems sciences.

The public can now share in the concerts and experiments conducted at The WIRED Lab’s residencies with artists such as Alan Lamb, Chris Watson, Robin Fox, Oren Ambarchi, Garry Bradbury, Sarah Last, and David Burraston.

The launch of the website was celebrated with the live performance by Wired Lab members David Burraston and Garry Bradbury performing a live set of compositions derived from the wire systems at SuperDeluxe@Artspace performance series at the Biennale of Sydney on July 24th.

The WIRED Lab: http://www.wiredlab.org

2010-07-28

Could this better sound editing?

How many of us are always trying to find the perfect way to work? When editing sound, the traditional mouse is the first peripheral to go due to bad ergonomics. Most editors work with trackballs, however even this tends to have slight problems depending on your desk/ chair height combination. Apple today released the Magic Trackpad. Could this be our next favorite editing tool? With only a quick look at it and no actual physical testing, I am unsure of how accurate cursor movements will be. If they are acurate, than this may  be a handy device to have.